Thunder Tiger Raptor 30 V2

Thunder Tiger Raptor 30 Radio Control Helicopter

May 02, 2015



Home
About
What's New
History
Models Gallery
Model Building Safety
Articles
Mail & FAQ
Site Map
Site Feedback
Contact
Register
Add to Favorites
Tell a Friend
Comments
Design and Build Contest
Items For Sale
Search Airfield Models

Back to Raptor V2

 

Airfield Models (http://www.airfieldmodels.com/)Building the Thunder Tiger Raptor 30 V2 Helicopter Step Twenty

 
 

Step Twenty Main Rotor Assembly

  • These steps are on pages 16 and 35 of the Instruction Manual.
 
The manual includes a "Blade Modification" page (Page 35 of the manual) which you should not consider optional. The manual includes a "Blade Modification" page (Page 35 of the manual).

Frankly, I don't think the modification should be considered a modification which may lead one to believe it is optional.

The steps in the modification should be considered standard and required.

Parts bags for this assembly. Parts bags for this assembly.
Parts for the rotor blade assembly.  Blades are not shown. Parts for the rotor blade assembly.  Blades are not shown.
Use a heat gun to tighten the blade covering.  Insert a blade grip on the top or bottom. The first thing you should do is use a heat gun to shrink the blade covering.

Start with the gun a good distance from the blade and keep the gun moving.  You simply want to tighten the heat shrink covering.

Cut the covering away from the holes in both the top and bottom of each blade.

Place only one blade grip in the blades at a time.  If you insert both grips you'll have a tough time getting them back out.  I had to use a rubber mallet to fully set the grips.

Trace around the blade grip using a Sharpie marker.  Remove the grip and repeat for the other side of the blade. Trace around the grip using a Sharpie marker.  Remove the blade grip and repeat for the other side of the blade.

If they don't come out easily, which they probably won't if you used a mallet to insert them, use a dowel from the opposite side to force them out.

Cut away the covering about 1/16" inside the line. Cut away the covering about 1/16" inside the line.
Soak the holes in the blade and the exposed wood at the root using thin CA. Use thin Cyanoacrylate to soak the holes and the exposed root end of the blades.

Allow the CA to fully cure.

Sand the inside of the blade grips to roughen them for glue. Sand the inside of the blade grips to roughen them.  I used a well worn sanding disk at low speed in a Dremel Mini Mite.

If you use a moto tool, work at slow speed and be very careful.  We aren't trying to remove material just roughen the surface for glue.

The safest way to go is to use 80 grit paper by hand.

When you finish sanding, clean the blade grip with alcohol.

Mix up some good 30 minute or slower epoxy. Use a good 30 minute or slower epoxy to attach the blade grips to the blades.
Apply epoxy to the inside of the blade grips and the exposed wood of the blade. Using a flux brush (epoxy brush) spread epoxy on the inside of the blade grips and the exposed wood of the blades.

Be sure that the epoxy overlaps onto the plastic.  It's not a bad idea to get the exposed root end of the blade while you're at it.

Attach the blade grips to the blades using self-tapping screws. Attach the blade grips to the blades and fully seat them.  Insert the self-tapping screws and tighten them.

Wipe up excess epoxy using alcohol on a paper towel.

Clamp the blade grips until the epoxy has fully cured. Clamp the blade grips until the epoxy has fully cured.
Attach the blades to the main rotor pitch housings such that the blades turn clockwise when viewed from above. Insert a lock nut into the recess in the underside of each main rotor pitch housing.

Insert the rotor blades such that they turn clockwise when viewed from above.

Insert the socket screw and tighten the blades.  They should be fairly tight - just loose enough that it takes some effort to reposition the blades.  If you leave these bolts too loose you're asking for a tail boom strike which is not only expensive but it also means you'll lose a lot of trim settings when you make new linkages.

The helicopter is now fully assembled except we still haven't attached the muffler or fuel lines.  Attach the muffler and fuel lines.  Now the helicopter is fully assembled.

If you haven't done it already, turn on the radio and move the sticks around and watch all the linkages and levers on your heli move.  Ensure everything is moving the in proper direction.  Do this until you get bored.  You may get some rest now.

That was the easy part.  The next step is to spend hours and hours balancing, adjusting and tweaking before you should even consider flying the beast.

If you don't know what you're doing then I strongly encourage you to seek qualified assistance.  If you choose to ignore this advice then whatever you do, don't start the engine anywhere near people.  Spinning rotor blades are extremely dangerous and have killed and maimed a lot of people.  As far as R/C vehicles go, there is none more dangerous than an out-of-control helicopter.

If you get some help from a live person who knows what he's doing, your helicopter will be set up better, you'll advance faster and the whole experience will be more fun and rewarding (not to mention less expensive) for you.

 
 

Previous
Next

Building the Raptor 30 V2 Helicopter - Step 19
BMJR Models Splash-E Electric Flying Boat

Comments about this article

 
 

Back to Thunder Tiger Raptor 30 V2
Airfield Models Home

 
 

Copyright 2006 Paul K. Johnson