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Make a Magnetic Building Board System to Build Model Aircraft

November 08, 2007



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This page has 8 comments.

 
 
 Southerner
Ellensburg, WA
Posted:December 26th, 2010
12.16 AM
Hello Paul

http://www.airfieldmodels.com/information_source/how_to_articles_for_model_builders/tools/magnetic_building_board/index.htm

in
Download Drawings
90 fixture drawings and notes (1.7 Mb zipped) points to: http://www.airfieldmodels.com/information_source/how_to_articles_for_model_builders/tools/magnetic_building_board/fixture.zip

contains the file: magnet_fixture.jpg



Also:

points to: Variable angle fixture drawings and notes (423 Kb zipped)
http://www.airfieldmodels.com/information_source/how_to_articles_for_model_builders/tools/magnetic_building_board/angle_fixture.zip

contains the file:
angle_fixture.jpg

I thought I remembered that you originally had the one (magnet_fixture.jpt) as a PDF file so that it was printed full size for the size fixture you showed (small I think or might have been 2 sizes on the page). Would it possible to get you to post those as a PDF--as well as the jpg in the zip file?

The inclusion of the DXF files would be a very helpful alternative as well.

This is a great project. There appears to be no building jigs even close to the functionality of your jog here that is currently available or published elsewhere.

Thank you for a great and classic DIY article and project.
 Benjamin ortiz
oceanside.ca
Posted:March 12th, 2010
5.48 PM
Just came back from Lowes with a piece of galvinized metal and
two boxes of their small magnets. I am building a peanut scale model
and wanted to try this system out. Lowes sells a large piece [4'x4'] for $16
dollars. I used a sharp utility blade and straight edge to cut pieces to suit my needs.
 Benjamin ortiz
oceanside.ca
Posted:March 12th, 2010
5.47 PM
Just came back from Lowes with a piece of galvinized metal and
two boxes of their small magnets. I am building a peanut scale model
and wanted to try this system out. Lowes sells a large piece [4'x4'] for $16
dollars. I used a sharp utility blade and straight edge to cut pieces to suit my needs.
 JKSjr
Galena, Illinois
Posted:January 6th, 2010
6.36 PM
Greetings All ...
I'm just starting to put together a magnetic board and really appreciate the comments on this topic. I've thought of a couple of possibilities that I may use in the construction of my board and would like to pass them on.
(1) This would apply to anyone who either uses or has a friend who uses a graphics program like Adobe Illustrator. Create a custom grid at whatever size/scale you prefer and send or take that file to a local sign shop that can print on a selection of adhesive backed vinyls. Have them print your grid and adhere it to the metal (usually done by an auto feed roller type applicator since it's pretty difficult to do by hand). I think this would eliminate the requirement to use any spray finishes or powder coating to protect the metal. This grid could then be protected by an adhesive backed Lexan (or some type of polycarbonate) sheet to provide an extremely durable work surface while allowing any type of magnetic devices to work. Or, put that good ol' plastic drop cloth over it and replace as necessary.
(2) Re. Paul's comments on wood shims to level a work surface. This is a carpentry "trick" that I've used successfully but I think it would be applicable to leveling a work surface on a table. My example would be an installation of a custom made window sill over rough framing. Instead of wood shims (maddening!) I simply drive screws or lag bolts into the rough framing and adjust accordingly till the sill is dead on. To level a work surface it would be possible to use machine screws or socket head screws driven through an MDF, plywood or whatever subsurface. Couple that with a laser leveling device that you beg, borrow or rent if you have to and (barring seismic events) you're going to have a truly level playing field.
 Matt
Australia
Posted:December 18th, 2008
4.36 AM
G'day Paul,

Where can I find plans to make the Knight Stik ? Does it come under a different name ? I searched the internet and could find anything.
 Tom Schaefer
Sydney/Australia
Posted:February 11th, 2007
11.15 PM
Sorry if I have commented already along the same lines but I am missing the link to the drawings for the fixtures you refer to on your site.
I have made dxf drawings according to what I have seen on your photos and would be happy to mail these to you for inclusion on your site if I can get an email address off you.
 Harlequin
Madeira
Posted:December 22nd, 2006
8.06 PM
I think a good idea for a magnetic board is powder coated
2mm steel sheet. This kind of finish is hard and lasts a long time. The problem is that the process of coating
needs heat that can cause some bending. Maybe 1mm or less
metal sheet laminated to MDF with contact glue would work
but it would require a some attention to make a perfect
plane. Steel sheet primed and then sprayed with automotive
two pack paint or clear seems to be a good solution too. Beside being flat I think a hard finish is
necessary to make the board last. I think you're right about
galvanized, it is a confusing surface to work. One cheap
way is to go to a junk yard and get a large undented
refrigerator door, magnets stick well to it...
 Damien_Nott
Australia
Posted:April 5th, 2004
6.46 AM
Hi Paul. I'm currently having a building board made at the workshop where I've been working, and thought I'd pass on the construction. I've noticed that a few people have been using 1/4" steel as the board, and that struck me as being a bit heavy & awkward to move around, so after consultation with the carpenters & sheetmetal people at the workshop, I decided to use a sheet of 2mm (3/32") steel mounted on a piece of 16mm (5/8") medium density fibreboard. The fibreboard is not affected by temperature, and is a more stable medium than plywood. I'm having it sealed with estapol. The steel will be powdercoated either light grey or white (the painter's choice) and then it will be bonded to the fibreboard with contact adhesive, and screwed along the edges (countersunk, of course.) A fine whiteboard marker will be used to mark centrelines etc, as whiteboard cleaner doesn't affect the finish. Alternatively, a sheet of Contact (self-adhesive protective plastic cover used on books, shelves etc.) would be placed over the steel, and removed when it became too ratty. (I would've liked to scribe or engrave a grid on the steel but time constraints are preventative - I'm back in my office at the end of the week.) The dimensions of the fibreboard are 1800 x 600mm (6' x 2' approx), with the steel smaller by 20mm (3/4") all round - it would've been bigger if the workshop had a bigger offcut. Still, it will be big enough for my requirements at the moment. My magnets are on the way, and my new saw-bench will take care of the fittings in short order. Take care Damien
 
 

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